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LO8. Describe how addiction issues can develop To pass this task, the student must describe; Achieved/Not Achieved • factors in terms of developing problems • a range of common behaviours that may be demonstrated by people accessing addition services Additional comments: Task 9: Addictiv

Task 1: Describe mental health issues
For this task you need to describe mental health issues and how they present and their potential impact on mental health service users and their natural supports.

26984 Outcome 1: Describe mental health issues.
Range evidence is required for Maori and two other cultural groups.
E.R. 1.1 Mental health issues are described in relation to the DSM-5 classifications of mental health disorders.
Range issues may include – mood disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, adjustment disorders, disorders usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, and adolescence, dementia, delirium; evidence is required for a minimum of three issues.
E.R. 1.3 Mental health issues are described in terms of their potential impact on a person accessing mental health services and their natural supports.
Range evidence is required for the potential impact of three mental health issues.
1. Describe three mental health issues and how they present in relation to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental disorders (DSM) classifications of mental health disorders. Describe their potential impact on mental health service users and their natural supports. Ensure your answer is in your own words.
Issues may include: mood disorders; psychotic disorders; eating disorders; co-existing problems; anxiety disorders; personality disorders; adjustment disorders; disorders usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood and adolescence, dementia, delirium.
Mental health issue 1:
Mental health issue 2:
Mental health issue 3:
Marking Guide: Assessor feedback:
Students must be able to
LO1. Describe mental health issues
To pass this task, the student must describe;
Achieved/Not Achieved
• mental health issues in relation to the DSM-5 classifications of mental health disorders
• mental health issues in terms of their potential impact on a person accessing mental health services and their natural supports
Additional comments:
Task 2: Impact of mental health issues

26984 Outcome 1: Describe mental health issues.
E.R. 1.2 One positive and one negative effect of classifying mental health issues are described in terms of their potential impact on a person accessing mental health services and their natural supports.
1. Describe the potential impact of one positive and one negative effect of classifying mental health issues on MHA service users and their natural supports.
Positive effect:
Negative effect:
Marking Guide: Assessor feedback:
Students must be able to
LO1. Describe mental health issues
To pass this task, the student must describe;
Achieved/Not Achieved
• one positive and one negative effect of classifying mental health issues in terms of their potential impact on a person accessing mental health services and their natural supports
Additional comments:
Task 3: Addiction issues
For this question you must ensure that:
• addiction terminology is described in relation to the DSM-5 classifications of addictions.
• addiction is described in relation of the continuum of use.
• addiction is described in terms of its potential impact on addiction service users and their natural supports.
26984 Outcome 2: Describe addiction issues.
E.R. 2.1 Addiction issues are described in relation to where they fit within the DSM-5 classifications of addictive disorders.
Range issues must include – gambling disorder; issues may include – alcohol use disorder, cannabis use disorder, stimulant use disorder, opioid use disorder, poly substance use disorder, tobacco use disorder, intoxication and withdrawal; evidence is required for two issues in addition to gambling disorder.
E.R. 2.2 Substance use and/or gambling is described in relation to the continuum of use.
E.R. 2.3 Addiction is described in terms of its potential impact on a person who accesses addiction services and their natural supports.
1. Describe three addiction issues in accordance with the DSM-5 classifications of addictions. One addiction issue must be gambling. Answers must be in your own words.
Addiction issue 1: Gambling addiction
Continuum of use for gambling addiction:
The potential impact of gambling addiction on the service user and their natural supports:
Addiction issue 2:
Continuum of use for addiction 2:
The potential impact of addiction 2 on the service user and their natural supports:
Addiction issue 3:
Continuum of use for addiction 2:
The potential impact of addiction 2 on the service user and their natural supports:
Marking Guide: Assessor feedback:
Students must be able to
LO2. Describe addiction issues

To pass this task, the student must describe;
Achieved/Not Achieved
• addiction issues in relation to where they fit within the DSM-5 classifications of addictive disorders
• substance use and/or gambling in relation to the continuum of use
• addiction in terms of its potential impact on a person who accesses addiction services and their natural supports

Additional comments:
Task 4: Impact of co-existing problems
26984 Outcome 1: Describe the potential impact of co-existing mental health and addiction issues.
Range evidence is required for three individuals accessing mental health and/or addiction services; each person to have a different combination of co-existing mental health and addiction issues.
E.R. 3.1 Co-existing mental health and addiction issues are described in terms of their interplay and potential impact on a person accessing mental health and/or addiction services and their natural supports.
1. Describe the potential impact of three co-existing problems on three different MHA service users and their natural supports.
Co-existing problems for MHA service user 1:
Describe the interplay and potential impact of the co-existing problems for MHA service user 1 and their natural supports:
Co-existing problems for MHA service user 2:
Describe the interplay and potential impact of the co-existing problems for MHA service user 2 and their natural supports:
Co-existing problems for MHA service user 3:
Describe the interplay and potential impact of the co-existing problems for MHA service user 3 and their natural supports:
Marking Guide: Assessor feedback:
Students must be able to
LO3. Describe the potential impact of co-existing mental health and addiction issues

To pass this task, the student must describe;
Achieved/Not Achieved
• co-existing mental health and addiction issues in terms of their interplay and potential impact on a person accessing mental health and/or addiction services and their natural supports

Additional comments:
Task 5: Mental health wellbeing
For this task, you need to describe how a range of factors can contribute to mental health wellbeing or mental health problems and outline the lifestyle choices a person can make to promote their mental health.
26971 Outcome 1: Describe factors that contribute to mental health wellbeing.
E.R. 1.1 Factors that contribute to mental health wellbeing are described in terms of their capacity to strengthen a person against stressful life events.
Range contributing factors may include but are not limited to – cultural, environmental, physical, economic, psychological, social, spiritual, experiences of trauma; evidence is required for three contributing factors.
E.R. 1.2 Good mental health is described in terms of lifestyle choices that can be made to promote a person’s mental health wellbeing.
Range lifestyle choices may include but are not limited to – levels of physical activity, reduced intake or avoidance of alcohol and drugs, recreational activities, dietary management, career/employment opportunities; evidence is required for three lifestyle choices.
26971 Outcome 2: Describe factors that contribute to mental health problems.
E.R. 2.1 Factors that contribute to mental health problems are described in terms of their capacity to render a person vulnerable to stressful life events.
Range contributing factors may include but are not limited to – cultural, environmental, physical, economic, psychological, social, spiritual, experiences of trauma; evidence is required for three contributing factors.
1. How can the factors below contribute to mental health wellbeing and strengthen a person against stressful life events?
Choose three factors from the list below and describe how they can contribute to mental health wellbeing and strengthen a person against stressful life events.
• Cultural; Environmental; Physical; Economic; Psychological; Social; Spiritual; Experiences of trauma
First factor:
Second factor:
Third factor:
2. How can the factors below contribute to mental health problems and make a person more vulnerable to stressful life events?
Choose three factors from the list below and describe how they can contribute to mental health problems and make a person vulnerable to stressful life events.
• Cultural; Environmental; Physical; Economic; Psychological; Social; Spiritual; Experiences of trauma
First factor:
Second factor:
Third factor:
3. How can lifestyle choices help a person to promote their mental health wellbeing?
Choose three lifestyle choices from the list below and describe how they can promote mental health wellbeing.
• Physical activity; Reduced intake or avoidance of alcohol and drugs; Recreational activities; Dietary management; Career/employment opportunities
First lifestyle choice:
Second lifestyle choice:
Third lifestyle choice:
Marking Guide: Assessor feedback:
Students must be able to
LO4. Describe factors that contribute to mental health wellbeing
To pass this task, the student must describe;
Achieved/Not Achieved
• factors that contribute to mental health wellbeing in terms of their capacity to strengthen a person against stressful life events

• Good mental health in terms of lifestyle choices that can be made to promote a person’s mental health wellbeing
Students must be able to
LO5. Describe factors that contribute to mental health problems
To pass this task, the student must describe;
Achieved/Not Achieved
• factors that contribute to mental health problems in terms of their capacity to render a person vulnerable to stressful life events
Additional comments:
Task 6: Substance-related disorders
For this task, you need to describe how a range of factors can contribute to mental health wellbeing or mental health problems and outline the lifestyle choices a person can make to promote their mental health.
27076 Outcome 1 : Describe common substance-related disorders in New Zealand, and their effects on people accessing addiction services, and their effects on whanau and family.
Range evidence is required for three common substance-related disorders in New Zealand, one of which is alcohol.
E.R. 1.1 Common substance-related disorders in New Zealand are described in terms of their classifications under the DSM-V.
E.R. 1.2 The effects on people with addiction issues that result from common substance-use disorders in New Zealand are described in accordance with the references.
Range evidence is required of two effects on addiction service users for each addiction.
E.R. 1.3 The effects on whanau and family of people accessing addiction services as a result of common substance-use disorders in New Zealand are described in accordance with the references.
Range evidence is required for two effects on whanau and family supports for each substance-use disorder.
1. For this task you must describe three common substance-use disorders in terms of its classification under DSM-V in terms of substance use disorder and withdrawal. One of these substance-related disorders must be alcohol. You must describe their effects on people accessing addiction services and their effects on their whanau and family support (in accordance with the references at the end of this assessment).
Common substance-related disorders refers to depressants, stimulants, cannabis, opioids, hallucinogens, and phencyclidines.
• Describe alcohol addiction in terms of its classification under DSM-V in terms of substance use disorder and withdrawal.
• Describe two effects on people with addiction issues
• Describe two effects on whanau and family supports
• Describe the second common substance-use disorder in terms of its classification under DSM-V in terms of substance use disorder and withdrawal.
• Describe two effects on people with addiction issues
• Describe two effects on whanau and family supports
• Describe the third common substance-use disorder in terms of its classification under DSM-V in terms of substance use disorder and withdrawal.
• Describe two effects on people with addiction issues
• Describe two effects on whanau and family supports
Marking Guide: Assessor feedback:
Students must be able to
LO6. Describe common substance-related disorders in New Zealand, and their effects on addiction service users and their natural supports
To pass this task, the student must describe;
Achieved/Not Achieved
• common substance-related disorders in New Zealand in terms of their classifications under the DSM-V

• the effects on people with addiction issues that result from common substance-use disorders in New Zealand are described in accordance with the references

• the effects on the whanau and family supports of people accessing addiction services as a result of common substance-use disorders in New Zealand are described in accordance with the references

Additional comments:
Task 7: Non-Substance-related disorders
For this task, you need to describe how a range of factors can contribute to mental health wellbeing or mental health problems and outline the lifestyle choices a person can make to promote their mental health.
27076 Outcome 2: Describe common behavioural addiction issues in New Zealand, their effects on people accessing addiction services and their effects on whanau and family supports.
Range evidence is required for three common behavioural addiction issues in New Zealand, one of which is gambling.
E.R. 2.1 The effects on people accessing an addiction service as a result of common behavioural addiction issues in New Zealand are described in accordance with the references.
Range evidence is required for two effects on people accessing addiction services for each addiction issue.
E.R. 2.2 The effects on the whanau and family of people accessing an addiction service as a result of common behavioural addiction issues in New Zealand are described in accordance with the references.
Range evidence is required for two effects on whanau and family supports for each addiction issue
1. For this task you must describe gambling and two other common non-substance-related disorders in New Zealand and their effects on people accessing addiction services users and their whanau and family support. (in accordance with the references at the end of this assessment).
Non-substance-related disorders refers to addictions such as those related to gambling, internet, work, food, sex, risk-taking, shopping.
• Describe gambling as a behavioural addiction issue.
• Describe two effects of gambling on people accessing addiction services
• Describe two effects of gambling on whanau and family supports
• Describe behavioural addiction issue 2.
• Describe two effects of behavioural addiction issue 2 on people accessing an addiction service
• Describe two effects of behavioural addiction issue 2 on whanau and family supports of people accessing an addiction service
• Describe behavioural addiction issue 2.
• Describe two effects of behavioural addiction issue 3 on people accessing an addiction service
• Describe two effects of behavioural addiction issue 3 on whanau and family supports of people accessing an addiction service
Marking Guide: Assessor feedback:
Students must be able to
LO7. Describe common behavioural addiction issues in New Zealand, their effects on people accessing addiction services, and their effects on whanau and family

To pass this task, the student must describe;
Achieved/Not Achieved
• the effects on people accessing an addiction service as a result of common behavioural addiction issues in New Zealand in accordance with the references
• the effects on whanau and family supports of people accessing an addiction service as a result of common behavioural addiction issues in New Zealand in accordance with the references
Additional comments:
Task 8: Addictive behaviours
27076 Outcome 3: Describe how addiction issues can develop
Range three factors contributing to the development and maintenance of addiction issues
E.R. 3.1 Factors are described in terms of developing problems
Range factors may include but are not limited to – anxiety, stress, trauma, adverse childhood experiences, distress, low mood, learned behaviour and/or modelling
E.R. 3.2 A range of common behaviours that may be demonstrated by people accessing addiction services are described
Range behaviours may include but are not limited to – hiding the behaviour, denial of problems with the behaviour, personal control and loss of control of the behaviour and minimising the behaviour.
1. For this task you must describe three factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of addiction issues. Factors may include but are not limited to; anxiety, stress, trauma, adverse childhood experiences, distress, low mood, learned behaviour and modelling.
Factor 1:
Factor 2:
Factor 3:
2. Describe the following common behaviours that may be demonstrated by people accessing addiction services.
Behaviour Description
Hiding the behaviour
Denial of problems with the behaviour
Personal control of the behaviour
Loss of control of the behaviour
Minimising the behaviour
Marking Guide: Assessor feedback:
Students must be able to
LO8. Describe how addiction issues can develop
To pass this task, the student must describe;
Achieved/Not Achieved
• factors in terms of developing problems
• a range of common behaviours that may be demonstrated by people accessing addition services
Additional comments:
Task 9: Addictive behaviours
27076 Outcome 3 : Describe how addition issues develop.
E.R. 3.3 Actions that may be taken to support people with addiction issues are described in accordance with the references
Range evidence is required for a minimum of three actions
3. Describe three actions that may be taken to support people with addiction issues in accordance with the references at the end of this assessment.
Action 1:
Action 2:
Action 3:
Marking Guide: Assessor feedback:
Students must be able to
LO8. Describe how addition issues can develop
To pass this task, the student must describe;
Achieved/Not Achieved
• actions that may be taken to support people with addiction issues in accordance with the references
Additional comments:
Primary references
? Kina Families and Addictions Trust (July, 2005). Family inclusive practice in the addiction field: A guide for practitioners working with couples, families and whanau. Available at www.kinatrust.org.nz
? The Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand offers a comprehensive range of fact sheets, frequently asked questions (FAQs), an on-line library catalogue, and related links for publications and information on non-substance-related disorders available at www.pgfnz.org.nz
? National Addiction Centre: University of Otago, & Matua Raki National Addiction Treatment Workforce Development Programme. (n.d.). Orientation to the addiction treatment field Aotearoa New Zealand. Christchurch. Available at www.matuaraki.org.nz
Guidance and Explanatory notes
1 Legislation relevant to this unit standard includes:
• Alcoholism and Drug Addiction Act 1966;
• Criminal Justice Act 1985;
• Children, Young Persons, and Their Families Act 1989;
• Criminal Procedure Act 2011;
• Criminal Procedure (Mentally Impaired Persons) Act 2003;
• Health and Disability Commissioner (Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights) Regulations 1996;
• Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003;
• Intellectual Disability (Compulsory Care and Rehabilitation) Act 2003;
• Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992;
• Misuse of Drugs Act 1975;
• Oranga Tamariki Act 1989;
• Privacy Act 1993;
• Protection of Personal and Property Rights Act 1988;
• Substance Addiction (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment Act) 2017;
• Vulnerable Children Act 2014.
2 New Zealand Standards relevant to this unit standard include:
• NZS 8134.0:2008 Health and disability services Standards – Health and disability services (general) Standard;
• NZS 8134.1:2008 Health and disability services Standards – Health and disability services (core) Standards;
• NZS 8134.2:2008 Health and disability services Standards – Health and disability services (restraint minimisation and safe practice) Standards;
• NZS 8134.3:2008 Health and disability services Standards – Health and disability services (infection prevention and control) Standards.
• New Zealand Standards are available at http://www.standards.co.nz/.
3 Primary references
Substance-related disorders –
• Kina Families and Addictions Trust (July, 2005). Family inclusive practice in the addiction field: A guide for practitioners working with couples, families and whanau; available at http://www.kinatrust.org.nz/myfiles/FIP.pdf.
Non-substance-related disorders –
• The Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand offers a comprehensive range of fact sheets, frequently asked questions (FAQs), an on-line library catalogue, and related links for publications and information; available at http://www.pgfnz.org.nz/Home/0,271,1132,00.html.
Substance and non-substance-related disorders –
• National Addiction Centre: University of Otago, & Matua Raki National Addiction Treatment Workforce Development Programme. (n.d.). Orientation to the addiction treatment field Aotearoa New Zealand. Christchurch: Author; available at
http://www.matuaraki.org.nz/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=67:orientation-to-the-addiction-treatment-field-aotearoa-new-zealand&catid=23:matua-raki-publications&Itemid=51.
4 References
• American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-5 (5th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association; available at http://www.psych.org.
• Babor, T.F., & Higgins-Biddle, J.C. (2001). Brief intervention for hazardous and harmful drinking: A manual for use in primary care. Geneva: World Health Organization; available at http://www.who.int/substance_abuse/publications/alcohol/en/index.html.
• Le Va, Pasifika within Te Pou, The National Centre of Mental Health Research, Information and Workplace Development. (2009). Real Skills plus Seitapu – Working with Pacific Peoples. Auckland: Le Va. Available at: https://www.leva.co.nz/resources/lets-get-real—real-skills-plus-seitapu—workingwith-pacific-peoples-le-va.
• Matua Raki. (2014) A Guide to the Addiction Treatment Sector in Aotearoa New Zealand. Wellington: Matua Raki; available at https://www.matuaraki.org.nz/uploads/files/resource-assets/a-guide-to-theaddiction-treatment-sector-in-aotearoa-new-zealand.pdf.
• Matua Raki, Te Pou. (2013). Te Whare o Tiki – Co-Existing Problems knowledge and skills framework; available at https://www.matuaraki.org.nz/uploads/files/resource-assets/Te-Whare-oTiki_Coexisting-Problems-knowledge-and-skills-framework.pdf.
• Mental Health Commission – Te Kaitataki Oranga; Ministry of Health. (1998). Guidelines for Clinical Risk Assessment and Management in Mental Health Services. Wellington: Ministry of Health in partnership with the Health Funding Authority. Available at http://www.mhc.govt.nz.
• Ministry for Culture and Heritage, (updated 17-May-2017), The Treaty in Brief available at https://nzhistory.govt.nz/politics/treaty/the-treaty-in-brief.
• Ministry of Health. (1998). Guidelines for clinical risk assessment and management in mental health services. Wellington: Ministry of Health in partnership with the Health Funding Authority.
• Ministry of Health. (2008). Let’s get real: Real Skills for people working in mental health and addiction. Wellington: Author; available at http://www.health.govt.nz.
• Prochaska, J. O., & DiClemente, C. C. (1982). Transtheoretical therapy: Toward a more integrative model of change. Psychotherapy: theory, research and practice, 19(3), 276-288.
• Rollnick, S. & Miller, W. R. (1995). What is motivational interviewing? Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 23, 325-334.
• Te Pou o te Whakaaro Nui, Le Va, Pasifika within Te Pou. (2009). Real Skills Plus Seitapu – Working with Pacific Peoples. Auckland: Author; available at http://www.tepou.co.nz.
• The Werry Centre. (2014). Real Skills Plus ICAMHS/AOD, 2014. A Competency Framework for the Infant, Child and Youth Mental Health and Alcohol and Other Drug Workforce. Auckland: Author; available at http://www.werryworkforce.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/Real%20Skills%20Plus%20 Dec%202014%20170315.pdf.
• Todd, F. (2010). Te Ariari o te Oranga: The Assessment and Management of People with Co-existing Mental Health and Drug Problems. Ministry of Health available at https://www.health.govt.nz/publication/te-ariari-o-te-orangaassessment-and-management-people-co-existing-mental-health-and-drugproblems.
• The Waitangi Tribunal and the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi, available at https://www.waitangitribunal.govt.nz/treaty-of-waitangi/.
5 Mental health, recovery and wellbeing are more than the absence of mental health and addiction issues. Concepts of wellbeing and recovery are different for every person and refer to living a satisfying, hopeful and meaningful life as each person defines that for themselves, even when there are ongoing mental health and/or addiction issues. (Adapted from the Monitoring and Advocacy report of the Mental Health Commissioner, Auckland).
6 Definitions
• Addiction refers to a ‘maladaptive pattern of substance use or problem gambling that leads to a clinically significant impairment or distress. Substance use disorders and pathological gambling disorder are characterised by dyscontrol, [increased] tolerance, withdrawal, and salience [conspicuous behaviour], and they are considered chronic relapsing conditions’ (Let’s get real, ‘Glossary’, p. 25). ‘Maladaptive’ in the context of this definition refers to any pattern of substance use or problem gambling that is unconstructive or disruptive, and which does not assist or promote the ability of a person to adjust the addictive behaviour which he or she is exhibiting.
• Addiction service user in the context of this unit standard refers to a person accessing services in a mental health or addiction setting. Service users may also be known as consumers, clients, patients, turoro, or tangata whai ora in particular contexts and settings.
• Co-existing mental health and addiction issues primarily refer to the presence of both mental health and addiction issues but can also refer to other issues including physical health, housing, relationship and disabilities. Co-existing mental health and addiction issues have in the past been referred to as ‘co-existing problems’, ‘multi-morbidity’, ‘co-morbidity’, ‘dual diagnosis’, and ‘co-occurring disorders’.
• Common substance-related disorders refers to depressants, stimulants, cannabis, opioids, hallucinogens, and phencyclidines.
• Continuum of use refers to levels of use: no use; social use; hazardous use; harmful use, mild substance use disorder; moderate substance use disorder; severe substance use disorder.
• The DSM-5 classifies disorders; in this unit standard the term issues is used instead of ‘disorders’.
• Effects on addiction service users and their natural supports refers to physical, social, cognitive, cultural and/or spiritual, and psychological effects.
• Mental health problems refers to any psychological or behavioural signs or symptoms that are not part of normal human development or culture, and which may suggest – or could lead to – a formal diagnosis of a recognised mental health disorder.
• Mental health wellbeing is defined by the World Health Organization as ‘a state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community’ (WHO. (2001a). Strengthening mental health promotion. Geneva: Author [Fact sheet No. 220], p. 1).
• Natural supports refer to any assistance, relationships, or interactions provided to person accessing mental health and/or addiction services by family and/or whanau, friends, peers, co-workers, or community volunteers. In a specifically Maori context, natural supports may include but are not limited to – kaumatua, kuia, tohunga, whanau, iwi, and hapu.
• Non-substance-related disorders refers to addictions such as those related to gambling, internet, work, food, sex, risk-taking, shopping.
• Wellbeing encompasses all dimensions of health: tinana (physical), hinengaro (mental and emotional), whanau (social), and wairua (spiritual) (Let’s get real, glossary). In its broadest sense wellbeing refers to a person’s level of good physical and mental health, and the extent to which they are enabled to live healthy and flourishing lives.
‘This resource is the property of Kalandra Education Group. It has been adapted from Careerforce material covering trainee assessment documents for ‘Describe mental health and addiction issues, and the potential impact of co-existing issues’, ’Describe factors that contribute to mental health wellbeing and mental health problems’ and ‘Describe common substance and non-substance-related disorders in New Zealand, their effects, and types of addictive behaviour’.

The post LO8. Describe how addiction issues can develop To pass this task, the student must describe; Achieved/Not Achieved • factors in terms of developing problems • a range of common behaviours that may be demonstrated by people accessing addition services Additional comments: Task 9: Addictiv appeared first on My Academic Papers.

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